Commentary

A Party of One

– Daniel DiSalvo, "A Party of One," Commentary, January 17, 2017.
Daniel DiSalvo reviews a new collection of essays by Nathan Glazer: The son of Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrants from Poland, Glazer grew up in East Harlem. He attended the City College of New York and then split his professional life between magazines and… More

Nathan Glazer: An Appreciation by Peter Skerry

– Peter Skerry, National Affairs (Spring 2016).
Excerpt: If Nathan Glazer seems destined to stand apart from the tribe into which he was born, he has also been an interloper in the tribes among which he has lived and worked — tribes that don’t even realize that they are tribes. Indeed, it is… More

Nathan Glazer’s Warning by Howard Husock

– Husock, Howard. "Nathan Glazer's Warning." City Journal, Summer 2011.
President Obama’s revival of an ambitious social policy agenda makes this a good time to reexamine the work of one of the most brilliant critics of the first wave: Nathan Glazer, now 88, a Harvard sociologist and one of the last of the founding generation… More

Nathan Glazer and Multiculturalism by James Traub

– Traub, James. "I Was Wrong: Nathan Glazer comes to terms with multiculturalism." Slate, May 17, 1997.
Nathan Glazer, the Harvard social scientist and core member of the group known as the New York Intellectuals, appears to be haunted by second thoughts. This may be a sign of irresolution. In a review of Glazer’s latest book, We Are All… More

Ethnic Dilemmas: 1964-1982, reviewed by Charles Krauthammer

– Krauthammer, Charles.  "Ethnic Dilemmas 1964-1982, by Nathan Glazer Reviewed." Commentary, October 1984.
Excerpt: It is hard to imagine that a book of three hundred pages on affirmative action and associated subjects, pages written over eighteen years of fierce and emotional debate on the issue, could be a model of clarity and measured reasoning…

Affirmative Discrimination Reviewed by William Petersen

– Petersen, William. "Affirmative Discrimination, by Nathan Glazer Reviewed." Commentary, May, 1976.
This important book is one of the first full-length accounts of the reverse discrimination known as “affirmative action,” and of how that policy has operated in the fields of employment.